Glamping Italy

Have you ever wished to be as close to nature as possible, but still have all the comfort of your own house? Then you should try glamping for your next holiday. Glamping is a combination of the English words “glamorous” and “camping”, meaning that you are out in nature as its finest and have all your needs met. From fully equipped kitchenette, bathroom and toilet to central heating, tv on top of a fireplace and even saunas, our glamping accommodations have it all. Almost all of them allow pets on the premises, have big garden naturally grown fruits and veggies, straight from the garden and a barbeque, ready to be lightened up.

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Glamping Italy

Have you ever wished to be as close to nature as possible, but still have all the comfort of your own house? Then you should try glamping for your next holiday. Glamping is a combination of the English words “glamorous” and “camping”, meaning that you are out in nature as its finest and have all your needs met. From fully equipped kitchenette, bathroom and toilet to central heating, tv on top of a fireplace and even saunas, our glamping accommodations have it all. Almost all of them allow pets on the premises, have big garden naturally grown fruits and veggies, straight from the garden and a barbeque, ready to be lightened up.

So, glamping is great, but we all know that the location makes for the perfect holiday not the accommodation. Italy is one of our busiest booking places all year round. No matter if you are a fan of skiing high up in the mountains or getting the perfect tan laying on a shiny beach, Italy has it all.

Nature

Combining the features of the sea coast and mountain peaks covered with forest massifs, the Italian nature is like something straight out of a fairytale. A significant part of Italy is covered by mountains. On the north the Alpine mountain system pierce the skies with a highly varied relief and amazing natural diversity. Feast your eyes on this complex system of ridges and valleys, covered with dense forests alternating and beautiful alpine meadows. The Dolomites stand at the Eastern Alps and are on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

The major territory of the Italian peninsula is dominated by the Apennine Mountains. The Calderone glacier is located there. The Apennines are filled with many karst phenomena, such as hollows, caves, underground water channels, deep gorges, vast alpine plateaus with canyons passing straight through them, white peaks and vertiginous rock faces. The flora is so diverse there from the usual Apennine beech forests, which covers most of the mountains to silver fir, holly and yew. Higher above the tree line patches of mountain pine and dwarf juniper grow amongst the vast grasslands.

Advancing ice sheets during the last Ice Age forced isolated populations of the Apennine wolf and Marsican brown bear up in the Apennines. The population of chamois is slowly recovering thanks to the introduction of strict protection laws. Other typical species of the Apennines include the endemic spectacled salamander and the rare Orsini viper.

Some of the most famous and loveliest thermal springs are found in Tuscany. In the north Sardinia, the Maddalena Archipelago is a series of islands containing some of Italy’s most heavenly beaches. Umbria is also not to be missed with its colorful flowery plateau containing lentils, poppies, violets, narcissus, daisies, clovers and more. Or check out the Langhe region has rolling hills, medieval villages and carefully manicured vineyards. And when the tide is low enough you can enter via small boat into the Blue Grotto. Watch the mystical blue lights, caused by sunlight passing through a deep underwater cavity and shining back up through the water.

Italy has many stunning lakes and rivers as well. Lakes like Como and Garda located in the Alps are a hot-spot for many tourists in the summer months. The river Po runs through Italy and it is the longest river in the country. In the natural park Gola della Rossa e di Frasassi are located Grotte di Frasassi, most famous Italian cave system. This stunning underworld mesmerizes by filigree columns, unusual stalactites, and stalagmites.

Activities

Italy is known for its long and sunny days, so make sure you take your comfy shoes and sunscreen before going out, exploring this beautiful country. And comfy shoes are all you are going to need if planning for a hike on the 12-kilometer Sentiero Azzurro stretches from the city of Monterosso to Riomaggiore. The path is split in segments with amazing views and at points dangerous vertical cliffs above the sea. Or you can rent a bike and cycle through Tuscany's hilly countryside. Pass by the orchards and fields of poppies that cover the hills south and east of San Gimignano.

And of course, the Italian beaches should not be missed out. Check out the coastline of Puglia, in the heel of Italy's boot and the untouched beaches there, protected by the Parco Naturale Regionale Costa Otranto. Or go to the deserted golden beaches of Sardinia's west coast. While on the island of Sardinia you should challenge yourself by having a trip to through Gola Su Gorropu canyon. It takes almost a whole day through a landscape of eroded limestone cliffs above the brilliant blue sea. You can also take a trip to the famous Mount Vesuvius, the culprit behind the unfortunate fate of the city of Pompeii. It’s a long and exhausting hike all the way to the top and the terrain around you makes you feel like you’re on the moon, but the view from up there is worth it.

In the summer you can have a nice fishing afternoon or a boat ride on the 145 square kilometers of Lake Como. Or if winter is your favorite season check out the famous ski slopes all around the Alps and the Dolomites.

Italian weather

Climate in Italy vary depending of the location. The country has Mediterranean, subtropical, Oceanic, continental and Alpine climate. The Mediterranean climate has mild winters about 10 °C and warm summers- 25-28 °C. With precipitations mostly during winter. The humid subtropical climate is marked by hot and wet summers, while winters are moderately cold. The Oceanic climate can be found in altitude in the Apennines and in the alpine foothills. Summers are around 20 °C and winters can reach freezing temperatures. The continental climate is found in the Alps, around 1,200 meters. It has cold winters, between −7 and −3 °C and mild summers, with temperatures averaging from 13 to 18 °C. Everything above 1500 meters is going into the Alpine climate graph. The winters are harsh with temperatures reaching between −12 and −5 °C and summers are cool, reaching an average of 12 °C.