Villa with jacuzzi

Enjoy a wonderful summer evening with dinner in the courtyard after a hiking trip in the beautiful mountains. Drink a glass of aged wine in front of the unique backyard fireplace or dine outside in the charming dining area. During the day, relax on the sun loungers or refresh yourself in the villa’s jacuzzi. It sounds like a fairytail but it can be true! Take a look at our villa jacuzzi offers and you will have all of this! All of the villas are fully equipped, you only have to pack your luggage and get ready for the vacation in paradise!

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Villa jacuzzi

Enjoy a wonderful summer evening with dinner in the courtyard after a hiking trip in the beautiful mountains. Drink a glass of aged wine in front of the unique backyard fireplace or dine outside in the charming dining area. During the day, relax on the sun loungers or refresh yourself in the villa’s jacuzzi. It sounds like a fairytail but it can be true! Take a look at our villa jacuzzi offers and you will have all of this! All of the villas are fully equipped, you only have to pack your luggage and get ready for the vacation in paradise!

European fauna and flora

Despite successes in biodiversity conservation in Europe, populations of many species continue to disappear rapidly. Many large mammals, such as the polar bear, wolf, lynx and bison, are now rare in their native habitat, while others, such as tarpan and saiga, have disappeared from their habitats in Europe.

Plants

Compared to other parts of the Earth, Europe is relatively poor in plant species. As a result of several ice ages over millions of years, the wealth of flowering plants(about 12,500 species) is unevenly distributed across the continent. A significant proportion of European endemic plants grow in mountainous areas, such as the Alps, the Apennines, the Pyrenees, the Sierra Nevada, the Carpathians, as well as in the Baltic region and the Balkan Peninsula.

The number of endangered plant species in Europe, especially in its central part, is high and growing. A significant number of species have almost lost their original Central European perimeter of distribution and now predominate in Eastern Europe. Economic growth and the strengthening of agricultural production there can lead to a further reduction and disappearance of existing plant resources if adequate measures are not taken in time to protect them.

The unique diversity of the natural environment and the large number of endemic plants in some eastern and southern regions, such as the Carpathians, the Caucasus and the Balkan Mountains, the Alps, Cyprus, the Greek mountains, Crete and the Sierra Nevada, make conservation a global task.

Mammals

Europe is home to 250 species of mammals of nine different orders. Of these, 91% are native, while the remaining 9%(21 species) are imported by man in individual regions. This implementation process has had a significant impact in the UK, France, Germany and Italy. 44 species of mammals are endemic, found only in Southern Europe, the Alps and the Caucasus. No mammal species has become extinct in Europe in the last century. Currently, however, 7 mammals are critically endangered, 19 are endangered and 56 are vulnerable.

Amphibians and reptiles

With the movement south in Europe, there is a clear trend towards an increase in the number of species. The largest number of amphibians and reptiles have been found in the Mediterranean and Southeastern Europe. There are a total of 71 species of amphibians and 199 species of reptiles in Europe, including sea turtles. They all suffer greatly from the destruction of their habitats, which is the main reason for their decline in Europe. The rate at which habitats change is often too great to allow for survival or adaptation. There are 8 critically endangered reptiles, 12 endangered and 11 vulnerable in Europe. In amphibians, 2 species are critically endangered, 1 endangered and 7 are vulnerable.

Even short-term and simple changes in the natural environment can be catastrophic for the longer survival of the species. Reptile habitats are particularly at risk from fires that destroy them, as are the animals themselves. Compared to other groups of species, such as birds and mammals, amphibians and reptiles in Europe are not yet subject to adequate action and financial resources to protect them. Today, conservationists understand that reptiles and amphibians are among the most endangered groups of animal species in Europe and are calling for urgent protection measures.

Fish

There is much less variety of freshwater fish in Europe than in the tropics. On the European continent itself, there is a noticeable reduction in fish species from south to north. Human presence has destroyed fish habitats on a large scale, and many populations of rare species have disappeared in the last two centuries. There are 13 critically endangered species, 23 endangered and 47 vulnerable. Of the 227 species of freshwater fish found in Europe, 200 are considered native and 27 are imported(most from North America). In fact, little information is available on the status and distribution of freshwater fish. Therefore, significant work remains to be done on developing conservation strategies for fish fauna in Europe as a whole.

Pollution of freshwater is probably the only major reason for the extinction of large numbers of fish populations in Europe. Pollution comes mainly from household, agricultural and industrial waste, which can also be toxic, so that all types of fish can be destroyed.Changes in land use(drainage, monoculture, destruction of water basins) often cause problems such as salinization, acidification and changes in hydrological processes affecting important fish areas in the past. Migratory species are particularly threatened by dams and other facilities, and if these fish cannot reach their spawning grounds, they may become extinct in a few years.

Different activities in Europe

Bicycles, Copenhagen

You don't have to take a taxi around Copenhagen. Instead, take advantage of the free and convenient bicycle rental scheme available in this city.

"Deciphering the Da Vinci Code", Paris

Visiting the Louvre - the world's largest art gallery, is free on the first Sunday of each month(as well as on July 14, and if you are under 18 or teach art - at any time). Usually, to enjoy the Mona Lisa or guess the code of da Vinci, you have to pay 12 euros.

Chocolate, Zurich

What could be better than free chocolate? Only free beer. If you like pastries, go directly to the Lindt & Sprüngli chocolate factory in Zurich. There, the entrance to the Chocolate Museum is completely free.

The masterpieces of Gaudi, Barcelona

Among the biggest attractions of Barcelona is the fantastic architecture of Gaudi. All these monuments, including the famous Sagrada Familia, you can see for free. You can even sit on the famous Guell Park bench for free.

Climate

The temperate climate is most common in Europe. The maritime climate(mild winters and moderately warm summers) is typical of the western regions, the temperate continental climate(cold winters, warm and in some places hot summers) is typical of the eastern regions. The Mediterranean climate(mild and humid winters, hot and dry summers) is typical of the subtropical belt of Europe. There is enough rainfall in much of Europe, but it is unevenly distributed. While in Western Europe precipitation is in excess(Scandinavia and Great Britain have more than 2000mm of precipitation), Eastern Europe has insufficient precipitation(the Caspian lowland, for example, has precipitation of 100-500mm).